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blancmange

[bluh-mahnj, -mahnzh]
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noun
  1. a sweet pudding prepared with almond milk and gelatin and flavored with rum or kirsch.
  2. a sweet, white pudding made with milk and cornstarch and flavored with vanilla.

Origin of blancmange

1350–1400; apocopated variant of Middle English blancmanger < Middle French: literally, white eating. See blank, manger
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for blancmange

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • It will be then ready for blancmange or lemon jelly and is very delicate.

    Home Pork Making

    A. W. Fulton

  • They came right through into the kitchen, and fell into the blancmange.

  • At the very first steps of Peri we slipped about in all directions, like quivering fragments of blancmange.

    From the Caves and Jungles of Hindostan

    Helena Pretrovna Blavatsky

  • If nicely managed, the blancmange and jelly will look like eggs cut in half.

  • Midway down they were held up by Mary Jane, who replenished them with raspberry or orange jelly or with blancmange and jam.

    Dubliners

    James Joyce


British Dictionary definitions for blancmange

blancmange

noun
  1. a jelly-like dessert, stiffened usually with cornflour and set in a mould

Word Origin

C14: from Old French blanc manger, literally: white food
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for blancmange

n.

late 14c., from Old French blancmengier (13c.), literally "white eating," originally a dish of fowl minced with cream, rice, almonds, sugar, eggs, etc.; from blanc "white" (also used in Old French of white foods, e.g. eggs, cream, also white meats such as veal and chicken; see blank (adj.)) + mangier "to eat" (see manger).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper