Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

cadmium

[kad-mee-uh m]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a white, ductile divalent metallic element resembling tin, used in plating and in making certain alloys. Symbol: Cd; atomic weight: 112.41; atomic number: 48; specific gravity: 8.6 at 20°C.

Origin of cadmium

1815–25; < New Latin, equivalent to Latin cadm(īa) calamine (orig. Cadmēa terra < Greek Kadmeía gê Cadmean earth) + -ium -ium
Related formscad·mic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for cadmium

Historical Examples

  • When you are not using the Cadmium, it should be put in a vessel of water and kept there.

    The Automobile Storage Battery

    O. A. Witte

  • What Cadmium Is: Cadmium is a metal, just like iron, copper, or lead.

  • The Cadmium test may be used here to determine when the plates are charged.

  • With all the sulphides of cadmium a steel palette knife is best avoided.

  • Under this name chromate of cadmium was introduced some few years back.


British Dictionary definitions for cadmium

cadmium

noun
  1. a malleable ductile toxic bluish-white metallic element that occurs in association with zinc ores. It is used in electroplating, alloys, and as a neutron absorber in the control of nuclear fission. Symbol: Cd; atomic no: 48; atomic wt: 112.411; valency: 2; relative density: 8.65; melting pt: 321.1°C; boiling pt: 767°C

Word Origin

C19: from New Latin, from Latin cadmīa zinc ore, calamine, referring to the fact that both calamine and cadmium are found in the ore
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cadmium

n.

bluish-white metal, 1822, discovered 1817 by German scientist Friedrich Strohmeyer, coined in Modern Latin from cadmia, a word used by ancient naturalists for various earths and oxides (especially zinc carbonate), from Greek kadmeia (ge) "Cadmean (earth)," from Kadmos "Cadmus," legendary founder of Boeotian Thebes. So called because the earth was first found in the vicinity of Thebes (Kadmeioi was an alternative name for "Thebans" since the time of Homer).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

cadmium in Medicine

cadmium

(kădmē-əm)
n. Symbol Cd
  1. A soft metallic element occurring primarily in zinc, copper, and lead ores that is used in low-friction fatigue-resistant alloys, solders, batteries, nuclear reactor shields, and electroplating. Atomic number 48.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

cadmium in Science

cadmium

[kădmē-əm]
Cd
  1. A rare, soft, bluish-white metallic element that occurs mainly in zinc, copper, and lead ores. Cadmium is plated onto other metals and alloys to prevent corrosion, and it is used in rechargeable batteries and in nuclear control rods as a neutron absorber. Atomic number 48; atomic weight 112.41; melting point 320.9°C; boiling point 765°C; specific gravity 8.65; valence 2. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.