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consubstantial

[kon-suh b-stan-shuh l]
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adjective
  1. of one and the same substance, essence, or nature.

Origin of consubstantial

1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin consubstantiālis, equivalent to con- con- + substanti(a) substance + -ālis -al1
Related formscon·sub·stan·tial·ism, nouncon·sub·stan·tial·ist, nouncon·sub·stan·ti·al·i·ty, nouncon·sub·stan·tial·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for consubstantial

Historical Examples

  • Is that then the divine substance wherein Father and Son are consubstantial?

    Ulysses

    James Joyce

  • The Father is the essential principle, and yet He is consubstantial with the other two Persons.

    A Mediaeval Mystic

    Vincent Scully

  • The sequentiality of writing and the need to express sequences pertinent to conflicts are consubstantial.

  • Here it may be asked: If soul is manifested only as consubstantial with God, why this laboured effort to exhibit the recognition?

  • After his death, the troubles caused by the single word "consubstantial" agitated the empire with renewed violence.

    A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 2 (of 10)

    Franois-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)


British Dictionary definitions for consubstantial

consubstantial

adjective
  1. Christian theol (esp of the three persons of the Trinity) regarded as identical in substance or essence though different in aspect
Derived Formsconsubstantiality, nounconsubstantially, adverb

Word Origin

C15: from Church Latin consubstāntiālis, from Latin com- + substantia substance
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for consubstantial

adj.

late 15c., a term in the theology of the trinity, from Church Latin consubstantialis, from com- "with" (see com-) + substantia (see substance). In general use from 1570s. Related: Consubstantiality.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper