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Darwin

[dahr-win] /ˈdɑr wɪn/
noun
1.
Charles (Robert) 1809–82, English naturalist and author.
2.
his grandfather, Erasmus, 1731–1802, English naturalist and poet.
3.
a seaport in and the capital of Northern Territory, in N Australia.
Related forms
anti-Darwin, adjective
pro-Darwin, adjective

Northern Territory

noun
1.
a territory in N Australia. 523,620 sq. mi. (1,356,175 sq. km).
Capital: Darwin.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Darwin
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Darwin has noted that the condor was only to be found in the neighborhood of such cliffs.

    Flying Machines W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell
  • But Mr. Darwin's pronominal "we," in this connection, admits of qualification.

    Life: Its True Genesis R. W. Wright
  • She is manifestly as much puzzled over the problem as Mr. Darwin himself.

    Life: Its True Genesis R. W. Wright
  • At least, Mr. Darwin thinks so, and he is now the Sir Oracle of our party.

    Life: Its True Genesis R. W. Wright
  • We call upon Mr. Darwin and Professor Gray to rise and explain.

    Life: Its True Genesis R. W. Wright
British Dictionary definitions for Darwin

Darwin1

/ˈdɑːwɪn/
noun
1.
a port in N Australia, capital of the Northern Territory: destroyed by a cyclone in 1974 but rebuilt on the same site. Pop: 71 347 (2001) Former name (1869–1911) Palmerston

Darwin2

/ˈdɑːwɪn/
noun
1.
Charles (Robert). 1809–82, English naturalist who formulated the theory of evolution by natural selection, expounded in On the Origin of Species (1859) and applied to man in The Descent of Man (1871)
2.
his grandfather, Erasmus. 1731–1802, English physician and poet; author of Zoonomia, or the Laws of Organic Life (1794–96), anticipating Lamarck's views on evolution
3.
Sir George Howard, son of Charles Darwin. 1845–1912, English astronomer and mathematician noted for his work on tidal friction

Northern Territory

noun
1.
an administrative division of N central Australia, on the Timor and Arafura Seas: the Arunta Desert lies in the east, the Macdonnell Ranges in the south, and Arnhem Land in the north (containing Australia's largest Aboriginal reservation); the Ashmore and Cartier Islands constitute a separate Australian External Territory. Capital: Darwin. Pop: 198 700 (2003 est). Area: 1 347 525 sq km (520 280 sq miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Darwin

surname attested from 12c., from Old English deorwine, literally "dear friend," probably used as a given name and also the source of the masc. proper name Derwin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Darwin in Medicine

Darwin Dar·win (där'wĭn), Charles Robert. 1809-1882.

British naturalist who revolutionized the study of biology with his theory of evolution based on natural selection. His most famous works include Origin of Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871).

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Darwin in Science
Darwin
  (där'wĭn)   
British naturalist who proposed the theory of evolution based on natural selection (1858). Darwin's theory, that random variation of traits within an individual species can lead to the development of new species, revolutionized the study of biology.

Our Living Language  : The flora and fauna of the Galápagos Archipelago, a group of islands 650 miles west of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean, provided the inspiration for Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, which outlined his theory of evolution. Although Darwin spent some time studying medicine and later prepared for the clergy, graduating in 1828 from Christ's College, Cambridge, he couldn't deny his interest in geology and natural history. He spent five years (1831-36) as a naturalist aboard the HMS Beagle on an exploration of South America and Australia. In September 1835 the Beagle reached the Galápagos Archipelago. "This archipelago," Darwin wrote, "seems to be a little world within itself, the greater number of its inhabitants, both vegetable and animal, being found nowhere else." Darwin observed 26 species of birds, only one of which was known to exist anywhere else, as well as giant tortoises and other unusual reptiles. Each species, he observed, was uniquely adapted to the particular island on which it lived. Upon his return to England, Darwin refined his notes and continued to make scientific observations, this time of his own garden and of the animals kept by his family. In 1859, after 23 years of sustained work, he published On the Origin of Species, in which he argued that traits such as size and color vary from species to species and that individual variations of these traits are passed down from parents to offspring. More progeny are produced than there is available sustenance. Variations that contribute more successfully to attracting a mate and reproducing are passed down to more offspring, eventually influencing the entire species. Through this process of natural selection, the highly complex species of today gradually evolved from earlier, simpler organisms.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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