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daybreak

[dey-breyk] /ˈdeɪˌbreɪk/
noun
1.
the first appearance of daylight in the morning; dawn.
Origin of daybreak
1520-1530
First recorded in 1520-30; day + break
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for daybreak
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • One morning at daybreak I was awakened by Jim swinging back my door.

    The Underdog F. Hopkinson Smith
  • At daybreak they were in the entrance of the Straits, but the enemy were not in sight.

  • Proclaim at daybreak that I myself will review the troops in the Vivarrambla.

    Leila, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • The baron, with some of his retainers and all the foresters, halted at daybreak in Sherwood forest.

    Maid Marian Thomas Love Peacock
  • I go out at daybreak, driving the oxen to field, and I yoke them to the plough.

    English Villages P. H. Ditchfield
  • Have them ready by to-morrow at daybreak, when the messenger may start.'

    Micah Clarke Arthur Conan Doyle
British Dictionary definitions for daybreak

daybreak

/ˈdeɪˌbreɪk/
noun
1.
the time in the morning when light first appears; dawn; sunrise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for daybreak
n.

1520s, from day + break (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for daybreak

18
18
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