Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Words You've Been Using Wrong

disabuse

[dis-uh-byooz] /ˌdɪs əˈbyuz/
verb (used with object), disabused, disabusing.
1.
to free (a person) from deception or error.
Origin of disabuse
1605-1615
From the French word désabuser, dating back to 1605-15. See dis-1, abuse
Related forms
disabusal, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for disabuse
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • To disabuse the world of some of these, has been my object in the present little volume.

    Nuts and Nutcrackers Charles James Lever
  • But Joseph will write to her in the meanwhile and disabuse her of this.

    A Rent In A Cloud Charles James Lever
  • It was the first effort of the interpreter to disabuse me of this notion.

    To Whom This May Come Edward Bellamy
  • It was utterly vain to attempt to disabuse her; it would only have compromised all of us.

    Tancred Benjamin Disraeli
  • It will disabuse his mind of the notion that he has any claim on me.

    The Man from the Bitter Roots

    Caroline Lockhart
British Dictionary definitions for disabuse

disabuse

/ˌdɪsəˈbjuːz/
verb
1.
(transitive) usually foll by of. to rid (oneself, another person, etc) of a mistaken or misguided idea; set right
Derived Forms
disabusal, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for disabuse
v.

1610s, from dis- + abuse (v.). Related: Disabused; disabusing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Nearby words for disabuse

Word Value for disabuse

11
13
Scrabble Words With Friends