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Eclogues

[ek-lawgz, -logz]
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noun
  1. a collection of pastoral poems (42–37 b.c.) by Vergil.
Also called Bucolics.

eclogue

[ek-lawg, -log]
noun
  1. a pastoral poem, often in dialogue form.

Origin of eclogue

1400–50; late Middle English eclog < Latin ecloga < Greek eklogḗ selection, akin to eklégein to select; see ec-
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for eclogues

Historical Examples

  • Every naturalist concealed within him a lover of idylls or eclogues.

    The Industries of Animals

    Frdric Houssay

  • Their argument was as unlike one of the debates in Vergil's Eclogues as possible.

  • To the Reader, prefixed to translation of Eclogues of Mantuan, 1567.

  • Eclogues he called them, and meant to have published them by subscription.

  • His Eclogues are somewhat too long, if we compare them with the ancients.


British Dictionary definitions for eclogues

eclogue

noun
  1. a pastoral or idyllic poem, usually in the form of a conversation or soliloquy

Word Origin

C15: from Latin ecloga short poem, collection of extracts, from Greek eklogē selection, from eklegein to select; see eclectic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for eclogues

eclogue

n.

"short poem," especially a pastoral dialogue, mid-15c., from Latin ecloga "selection, short poem, eclogue," from Greek ekloge "selection," from eklegein "to select" (see eclectic).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper