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emotionalism

[ih-moh-shuh-nl-iz-uh m] /ɪˈmoʊ ʃə nlˈɪz əm/
noun
1.
excessively emotional character:
the emotionalism of sentimental fiction.
2.
strong or excessive appeal to the emotions:
the emotionalism of patriotic propaganda.
3.
a tendency to display or respond with undue emotion, especially morbid emotion.
4.
unwarranted expression or display of emotion.
Origin of emotionalism
1860-1865
First recorded in 1860-65; emotional + -ism
Related forms
nonemotionalism, noun
Synonyms
sentimentality, mawkishness.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for emotionalism
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Nowhere do we find such a combination of emotionalism with sanity.

  • Nor did the delicate female monopolize all the delicacy and emotionalism.

    The Secret Life

    Elizabeth Bisland
  • The Italians of the north have none of the emotionalism of the Neapolitans.

    Letters to an Unknown Prosper Mrime
  • That sort of courage is seldom moral; it is, at bottom, emotionalism.

    The Locusts' Years Mary Helen Fee
  • And yet all the emotionalism of this climax was centered elsewhere.

    The Zeppelin's Passenger E. Phillips Oppenheim
  • It had never before affected her beyond a flash of emotionalism.

    The Drums Of Jeopardy Harold MacGrath
  • They have an eighteenth-century restraint, and freedom from emotionalism and gush.

    The Art of Letters

    Robert Lynd
  • And I think you're singularly free of the emotionalism that so often plays hob with them all.

    Jason Justus Miles Forman
  • In the common daily life of the Japanese their emotionalism expresses itself in almost infinitely diverse ways.

British Dictionary definitions for emotionalism

emotionalism

/ɪˈməʊʃənəˌlɪzəm/
noun
1.
emotional nature, character, or quality
2.
a tendency to yield readily to the emotions
3.
an appeal to the emotions, esp an excessive appeal, as to an audience
4.
a doctrine stressing the value of deeply felt responses in ethics and the arts
Derived Forms
emotionalist, noun
emotionalistic, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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