Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

2017 Word of the Year

faux pas

[foh pah] /foʊ ˈpɑ/
noun, plural faux pas
[foh pahz; French foh pah] /foʊ ˈpɑz; French foʊ ˈpɑ/ (Show IPA)
1.
a slip or blunder in etiquette, manners, or conduct; an embarrassing social blunder or indiscretion.
Origin of faux pas
1670-1680
1670-80; < French: literally, false step
Synonyms
error; impropriety.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for faux pas
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • And had I committed a faux pas in refusing to deliver up the little bag?

    Against Odds Lawrence L. Lynch
  • Your Grace saved me a faux pas there, for Montaiglon is not what I fancied at all.

    Doom Castle Neil Munro
  • The truth is, I executed rather a faux pas over there at Asquith.

    The Celebrity, Complete Winston Churchill
  • They made one faux pas, and it is upon that we may—if we are careful—get the better of them.

    Mademoiselle of Monte Carlo William Le Queux
  • Even supposing that her brother has committed some faux pas?

    Of High Descent George Manville Fenn
British Dictionary definitions for faux pas

faux pas

/ˌfəʊ ˈpɑː; French fo pɑ/
noun (pl) faux pas (ˌfəʊ ˈpɑːz; French) (fo pɑ)
1.
a social blunder or indiscretion
Word Origin
C17: from French: false step
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for faux pas
n.

1670s, French, literally "false step."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Nearby words for faux pas

Word Value for faux

0
15
Scrabble Words With Friends