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filiation

[fil-ee-ey-shuh n]
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noun
  1. the fact of being the child of a certain parent.
  2. descent as if from a parent; derivation.
  3. Law. the judicial determination of the paternity of a child, especially of one born out of wedlock.
  4. the relation of one thing to another from which it is derived.
  5. the act of filiating.
  6. the state of being filiated.
  7. an affiliated branch, as of a society.

Origin of filiation

1425–75; late Middle English filiacion < Medieval Latin fīliātiōn- (stem of fīliātiō). See filiate, -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for filiation

Historical Examples

  • Filiation is thus sometimes paternal and sometimes maternal.

    The Truth About Woman

    C. Gasquoine Hartley

  • Wilt thou give me an inheritance, a filiation, any thing for my heart?

  • Thou art His by creation, but I am His also by adoption, filiation, sonship.

  • The filiation of modern European tongues is known to every one.

    Origin of Cultivated Plants

    Alphonse De Candolle

  • Lawyers are of opinion, that filiation is necessary to legitimation, but not è contra.


British Dictionary definitions for filiation

filiation

noun
  1. line of descent; lineage; derivation
  2. the fact of being the child of certain parents
  3. law the act or process of filiating
  4. law a less common word for affiliation order
  5. the set of rules governing the attachment of children to their parents and its social consequences
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for filiation

n.

1520s, from French filiation, from Medieval Latin filiationem (nominative filiatio), noun of action from filiare "to have a child," from Latin filius/filia (see filial).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper