Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

flurry

[flur-ee, fluhr-ee]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun, plural flur·ries.
  1. a light, brief shower of snow.
  2. sudden commotion, excitement, or confusion; nervous hurry: There was a flurry of activity before the guests arrived.
  3. Stock Exchange.
    1. a brief rise or fall in prices.
    2. a brief, unusually heavy period of trading.
  4. a sudden gust of wind.
Show More
verb (used with object), flur·ried, flur·ry·ing.
  1. to put (a person) into a flurry; confuse; fluster.
Show More
verb (used without object), flur·ried, flur·ry·ing.
  1. (of snow) to fall or be blown in a flurry.
  2. to move in an excited or agitated manner.
Show More

Origin of flurry

1680–90, Americanism; blend of flutter and hurry
Related formsflur·ried·ly, adverb

Synonyms

See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
2. upset, pother, stir, to-do, fuss, fluster, ado.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for flurry

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • As he looked the flurry of skirts subsided and she fell into stride, pursuing.

    The Black Bag

    Louis Joseph Vance

  • There was a great snarling and growling, a clashing of teeth and a flurry of bodies.

    White Fang

    Jack London

  • The inhabitants were surely all of them in a flurry of furious activity.

    A Spirit in Prison

    Robert Hichens

  • Azuba entered the store in the way in which she did most things, with a flurry and a slam.

    Cap'n Dan's Daughter

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • There had been a flurry of excitement in the kitchen just after dinner.

    Mary-'Gusta

    Joseph C. Lincoln


British Dictionary definitions for flurry

flurry

noun plural -ries
  1. a sudden commotion or burst of activity
  2. a light gust of wind or rain or fall of snow
  3. stock exchange a sudden brief increase in trading or fluctuation in stock prices
  4. the death spasms of a harpooned whale
Show More
verb -ries, -rying or -ried
  1. to confuse or bewilder or be confused or bewildered
Show More

Word Origin

C17: from obsolete flurr to scatter, perhaps formed on analogy with hurry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for flurry

n.

"snow squall" 1828, American English, with earlier senses of "commotion," etc., dating to 1680s; perhaps imitative, or else from 17c. flurr "to scatter, fly with a whirring noise," perhaps from Middle English flouren "to sprinkle, as with flour" (late 14c.).

Show More

v.

1757 in the commotion sense, from flurry (n.); 1883 in the snow sense. Related: Flurried; flurries; flurrying.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper