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for

[fawr; unstressed fer] /fɔr; unstressed fər/
preposition
1.
with the object or purpose of:
to run for exercise.
2.
intended to belong to, or be used in connection with: equipment for the army;
a closet for dishes.
3.
suiting the purposes or needs of:
medicine for the aged.
4.
in order to obtain, gain, or acquire: a suit for alimony;
to work for wages.
5.
(used to express a wish, as of something to be experienced or obtained):
O, for a cold drink!
6.
sensitive or responsive to:
an eye for beauty.
7.
desirous of: a longing for something;
a taste for fancy clothes.
8.
in consideration or payment of; in return for: three for a dollar;
to be thanked for one's efforts.
9.
appropriate or adapted to: a subject for speculation;
clothes for winter.
10.
with regard or respect to: pressed for time;
too warm for April.
11.
during the continuance of:
for a long time.
12.
in favor of; on the side of:
to be for honest government.
13.
in place of; instead of:
a substitute for butter.
14.
in the interest of; on behalf of:
to act for a client.
15.
in exchange for; as an offset to: blow for blow;
money for goods.
16.
in punishment of:
payment for the crime.
17.
in honor of:
to give a dinner for a person.
18.
with the purpose of reaching:
to start for London.
19.
contributive to:
for the advantage of everybody.
20.
in order to save:
to flee for one's life.
21.
in order to become:
to train recruits for soldiers.
22.
in assignment or attribution to: an appointment for the afternoon;
That's for you to decide.
23.
such as to allow of or to require:
too many for separate mention.
24.
such as results in:
his reason for going.
25.
as affecting the interests or circumstances of:
bad for one's health.
26.
in proportion or with reference to:
He is tall for his age.
27.
in the character of; as being:
to know a thing for a fact.
28.
by reason of; because of: to shout for joy;
a city famed for its beauty.
29.
in spite of:
He's a decent guy for all that.
30.
to the extent or amount of:
to walk for a mile.
31.
(used to introduce a subject in an infinitive phrase):
It's time for me to go.
32.
(used to indicate the number of successes out of a specified number of attempts):
The batter was 2 for 4 in the game.
conjunction
33.
seeing that; since.
34.
Idioms
35.
for it, British. in (def 32).
Origin of for
900
before 900; Middle English, Old English; cognate with Old Saxon for; akin to fore1, Latin per through, Greek pró before, ahead
Can be confused
for, fore, four.
Synonym Study
33. See because.

for-

1.
a prefix meaning “away,” “off,” “to the uttermost,” “extremely,” “wrongly,” or imparting a negative or privative force, occurring in verbs and nouns formed from verbs of Old or Middle English origin, many of which are now obsolete or archaic:
forbid; forbear; forswear; forbearance.
Origin
Middle English, Old English; compare German ver-, Greek peri-, Latin per-

for.

1.
2.
3.

For.

1.

F.O.R.

or f.o.r

1.
free on rails.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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British Dictionary definitions for for

for

/fɔː; unstressed /
preposition
1.
intended to reach; directed or belonging to: there's a phone call for you
2.
to the advantage of: I only did it for you
3.
in the direction of: heading for the border
4.
over a span of (time or distance): working for six days, the river ran for six miles
5.
in favour of; in support of: those for the proposal, vote for me
6.
in order to get or achieve: I do it for money, he does it for pleasure, what did you do that for?
7.
appropriate to; designed to meet the needs of; meant to be used in: these kennels are for puppies
8.
in exchange for; at a cost of; to the amount of: I got it for hardly any money
9.
such as explains or results in: his reason for changing his job was not given
10.
in place of: a substitute for the injured player
11.
because of; through: she wept for pure relief
12.
with regard or consideration to the usual characteristics of: he's short for a man, it's cool for this time of year
13.
concerning; as regards: desire for money
14.
as being: we took him for the owner, I know that for a fact
15.
at a specified time: a date for the next evening
16.
to do or partake of: an appointment for supper
17.
in the duty or task of: that's for him to say
18.
to allow of: too big a job for us to handle
19.
despite; notwithstanding: she's a good wife, for all her nagging
20.
in order to preserve, retain, etc: to fight for survival
21.
as a direct equivalent to: word for word, weight for weight
22.
in order to become or enter: to go for a soldier, to train for the priesthood
23.
in recompense for: I paid for it last week, he took the punishment for his crime
24.
(Brit, informal) for it, liable for punishment or blame: you'll be for it if she catches you
25.
nothing for it, no choice; no other course
conjunction
26.
(coordinating) for the following reason; because; seeing that: I couldn't stay, for the area was violent
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse fyr for, Old High German fora before, Latin per through, prō before, Greek pro before, in front

for-

prefix
1.
indicating rejection or prohibition: forbear, forbid
2.
indicating falsity or wrongness: forswear
3.
used to give intensive force: forgive, forlorn
Word Origin
Old English for-; related to German ver-, Latin per-, Greek peri-

f.o.r.

abbreviation
1.
free on rail
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for for
prep.

Old English for "for, before, on account of," from Proto-Germanic *fura (cf. Old Saxon furi "before," Old Frisian for, Middle Dutch vore, Dutch voor "for, before;" German für "for;" Danish for "for," før "before;" Gothic faur "for," faura "before"); see fore (adv.).

Use of for and fore gradually was differentiated in Middle English. Its use alone as a conjunction (not found before 12c.) probably is a shortening of common Old English phrases such as for þon þy "therefore," literally "for the (reason) that."

for-

prefix usually meaning "away, opposite, completely," from Old English for-, indicating loss or destruction, or completion, also used as an intensive or pejorative element, which is related to Old Norse for-, Dutch ver-, Old High German fir-, German ver-; from PIE *pr-, from root *per- (1) "forward, through" (see per). Probably originally in Germanic with a sense of "forward, forth," but with complex sense developments in the various languages. Ultimately from the same root as fore (adv.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with for
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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