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2017 Word of the Year

foreword

[fawr-wurd, -werd, fohr-] /ˈfɔrˌwɜrd, -wərd, ˈfoʊr-/
noun
1.
a short introductory statement in a published work, as a book, especially when written by someone other than the author.
Compare afterword.
Origin of foreword
1835-1845
First recorded in 1835-45; fore- + word
Can be confused
foreword, forward, forwards, froward (see synonym study at forward)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for foreword
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Of Shirley herself it is not necessary to say much in this foreword.

    The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851-52 Louise Amelia Knapp Smith Clappe
  • I read the story itself first and afterwards the preface, or foreword.

    Daisy Ashford: Her Book Daisy Ashford
  • In her foreword Mrs. Earle tells of the condition of the diary.

    The Historical Child Oscar Chrisman
  • An entry for "foreword" has been added to the Table of Content of this e-book.

    Manpower

    Lincoln Clarke Andrews
  • A list of these names and those to whom they apply is given in the foreword of the book.

    H. P. Blavatsky Alice Leighton Cleather
British Dictionary definitions for foreword

foreword

/ˈfɔːˌwɜːd/
noun
1.
an introductory statement to a book
Word Origin
C19: literal translation of German Vorwort
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for foreword
n.

1842, from fore- + word (n.); perhaps a loan-translation of German Vorwort "preface," modeled on Latin praefatio "preface."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Nearby words for foreword

Word Value for foreword

15
15
Scrabble Words With Friends