Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

Frances

[fran-sis]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a female given name: derived from Francis.

France

[frans, frahns; French frahns]
noun
  1. A·na·tole [a-na-tawl] /a naˈtɔl/, Jacques Anatole Thibault, 1844–1924, French novelist and essayist: Nobel Prize 1921.
  2. a republic in W Europe. 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Capital: Paris.
  3. Heraldry. fleurs-de-lis or upon azure: a bordure of France.
Related formsan·ti-France, adjectivepro-France, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for frances

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • "I wish he would take it into his head to come home," said Frances.

    Great Uncle Hoot-Toot

    Mrs. Molesworth

  • Then he asked Elsa and Frances to go out a little walk with him.

    Great Uncle Hoot-Toot

    Mrs. Molesworth

  • "It's—it's all his temper, I'm afraid," Frances allowed reluctantly.

    Great Uncle Hoot-Toot

    Mrs. Molesworth

  • Perhaps Elsa and Frances will be married, and have houses of their own by then.

    Great Uncle Hoot-Toot

    Mrs. Molesworth

  • "I don't know that I find that so difficult to fancy," said Frances.

    Great Uncle Hoot-Toot

    Mrs. Molesworth


British Dictionary definitions for frances

France1

noun
  1. a republic in W Europe, between the English Channel, the Mediterranean, and the Atlantic: the largest country wholly in Europe; became a republic in 1793 after the French Revolution and an empire in 1804 under Napoleon; reverted to a monarchy (1815–48), followed by the Second Republic (1848–52), the Second Empire (1852–70), the Third Republic (1870–1940), and the Fourth and Fifth Republics (1946 and 1958); a member of the European Union. It is generally flat or undulating in the north and west and mountainous in the south and east. Official language: French. Religion: Roman Catholic majority. Currency: euro. Capital: Paris. Pop: 62 814 233 (2013 est). Area: (including Corsica) 551 600 sq km (212 973 sq miles)Related adjectives: French, Gallic

France2

noun
  1. Anatole (anatɔl), real name Anatole François Thibault . 1844–1924, French novelist, short-story writer, and critic. His works include Le Crime de Sylvestre Bonnard (1881), L'Île des Pingouins (1908), and La Révolte des anges (1914): Nobel prize for literature 1921
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for frances

Frances

fem. proper name, from French, from Old French Franceise (Modern French Françoise), fem. of Franceis (see Francis).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

frances in Culture

France

Nation in Europe bordered by Belgium and Luxembourg to the north; Germany, Switzerland, and Italy to the east; the Mediterranean Sea and Spain to the south; and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Its capital and largest city is Paris.

Note

During the reign of Louis XIV (1653–1715), France was a principal world power and cultural center of Europe.

Note

The French Revolution, organized by leaders of the middle class and lower class, brought about an end to the French absolute monarchy and forged a transition from feudalism to the industrial era. A bloody and chaotic period, the Revolution helped lay the foundations of modern political philosophy and ultimately engulfed much of Europe in the Napoleonic Wars. (See Napoleon Bonaparte.)

Note

In the French and Indian War in the 1750s, the British and colonial forces drove the French from Canada and the region of the Great Lakes.

Note

In World War I, France was one of the Allies; much of that war was fought on French soil.

Note

In World War II, France's military resistance to the German army collapsed in the spring of 1940. Germans occupied much of France from 1940 to 1944. In 1944, the Allies invaded France, along with French troops, and drove the Germans out of France, finally defeating them in 1945.

Note

France is known for its wine, cheese, and cooking.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.