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gauzy

[gaw-zee] /ˈgɔ zi/
adjective, gauzier, gauziest.
1.
like gauze; transparently thin and light.
Origin of gauzy
1790-1800
First recorded in 1790-1800; gauze + -y1
Related forms
gauzily, adverb
gauziness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for gauzy
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Her style was "sylph," and so she was gauzy and floating in all her drapery.

    Confessions Of Con Cregan Charles James Lever
  • The hand felt as if it were covered with some gauzy veiling.

    The Shadow World

    Hamlin Garland
  • She had a gauzy tea-gown on, of a shade of blue like her eyes.

    Man and Maid Elinor Glyn
  • Its gauzy character is fully exposed by the Pendleton report.

    Lee and Longstreet at High Tide Helen D. Longstreet
  • The gauzy web is being delivered into the can in front of the carding machine.

    Clothing and Health Helen Kinne
British Dictionary definitions for gauzy

gauzy

/ˈɡɔːzɪ/
adjective gauzier, gauziest
1.
resembling gauze; thin and transparent
Derived Forms
gauzily, adverb
gauziness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gauzy
adj.

1796, from gauze + -y (2). Related: Gauziness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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