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2017 Word of the Year

glamour

or glamor

[glam-er] /ˈglæm ər/
noun
1.
the quality of fascinating, alluring, or attracting, especially by a combination of charm and good looks.
2.
excitement, adventure, and unusual activity:
the glamour of being an explorer.
3.
magic or enchantment; spell; witchery.
adjective
4.
suggestive or full of glamour; glamorous:
a glamour job in television; glamour stocks.
Origin of glamour
1710-1720
1710-20; earlier glammar, dissimilated variant of grammar in sense of occult learning
Usage note
See -or1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for glamour
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But—if indeed, you are dazzled by the glamour of a title—do not be too confident of his fealty.

    The Bacillus of Beauty Harriet Stark
  • But what did anything matter, if the glamour of the Nile was in our blood?

    It Happened in Egypt C. N. Williamson
  • Yet the fascinating possibility is like a taste for drink, or the glamour of cards.

    Meadow Grass Alice Brown
  • There is a mystery at the heart of the book that throws over it the glamour of romance.

    The Harbor Ernest Poole
  • But the 'glamour' of the moon is not a mere poetic invention or a lover's fancy.

    Storyology

    Benjamin Taylor
British Dictionary definitions for glamour

glamour

/ˈɡlæmə/
noun
1.
charm and allure; fascination
2.
  1. fascinating or voluptuous beauty, often dependent on artifice
  2. (as modifier): a glamour girl
3.
(archaic) a magic spell; charm
Word Origin
C18: Scottish variant of grammar (hence a magic spell, because occult practices were popularly associated with learning)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for glamour
n.

1720, Scottish, "magic, enchantment" (especially in phrase to cast the glamor), a variant of Scottish gramarye "magic, enchantment, spell," alteration of English grammar (q.v.) with a medieval sense of "any sort of scholarship, especially occult learning." Popularized by the writings of Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832). Sense of "magical beauty, alluring charm" first recorded 1840.

v.

1814, from glamour (n.). Related: Glamoured; glamouring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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10
14
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