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globose

[gloh-bohs, gloh-bohs]
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adjective
  1. having the shape of a globe; globelike.

Origin of globose

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin globōsus spherical, forming a globelike mass. See globe, -ose1
Related formsglo·bose·ly, adverbglo·bos·i·ty [gloh-bos-i-tee] /gloʊˈbɒs ɪ ti/, glo·bose·ness, nounsub·glo·bose, adjectivesub·glo·bose·ly, adverbsub·glo·bose·ness, nounsub·glo·bos·i·ty, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for globose

Historical Examples

  • The spores are globose or nearly so, with a large "nucleus" nearly filling the spore.

    The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise

    M. E. Hard

  • The spores are globose or a broad oval, with a small papilla at one end.

  • The spores are globose, even, 3–3.5 in diameter, with minute pedicels.

  • The spores are globose, rough, usually mixed with the hyph tissue.

  • Spores in mass incarnate to brownish-red, globose, even, 7–9 mic.


British Dictionary definitions for globose

globose

globous (ˈɡləʊbəs)

adjective
  1. spherical or approximately spherical
Derived Formsglobosely, adverbglobosity (ɡləʊˈbɒsɪtɪ) or globoseness, noun

Word Origin

C15: from Latin globōsus; see globe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for globose

adj.

"spherical," early 15c., "large and formless," from Latin globosus "round as a ball," from globus (see globe).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper