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gonorrhea

[gon-uh-ree-uh]
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noun Pathology.
  1. a contagious, purulent inflammation of the urethra or the vagina, caused by the gonococcus.
Also especially British, gon·or·rhoe·a.

Origin of gonorrhea

1540–50; < Late Latin < Greek gonórrhoia. See gono-, -rrhea
Related formsgon·or·rhe·al, adjectivegon·or·rhe·ic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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Word Origin and History for gonorrhea

n.

also gonorrhoea, 1520s, from Late Latin gonorrhoia, from gonos "seed" (see gonad) + rhoe "flow," from rhein "to flow" (see rheum). Mucus discharge was mistaken for semen. In early records often Gomoria, etc., from folk etymology association with biblical Gomorrah.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

gonorrhea in Medicine

gonorrhea

(gŏn′ə-rēə)
n.
  1. A sexually transmitted disease caused by gonococci and affecting mucous membrane chiefly of the genital and urinary tracts, marked by an acute purulent discharge and painful or difficult urination, though women often have no symptoms.
Related formsgon′or•rheal null adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

gonorrhea in Science

gonorrhea

[gŏn′ə-rēə]
  1. A sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes of the genital and urinary tracts, an acute discharge containing pus, and painful urination, especially in men. Women often have few or no symptoms.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gonorrhea in Culture

gonorrhea

[(gon-uh-ree-uh)]

An acute and sexually transmitted disease, caused by bacteria that invade the mucous membranes of the genitals and urinary tract. In women, the disease can also spread to the cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries, leading to chronic pelvic pain or infertility. In both sexes, the disease can spread to the joints and skin (or, more rarely, the heart or brain) if left untreated. The disease can be treated with antibiotics.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.