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impish

[im-pish] /ˈɪm pɪʃ/
adjective
2.
of, relating to, or characteristic of an imp.
Origin of impish
1645-1655
First recorded in 1645-55; imp + -ish1
Related forms
impishly, adverb
impishness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for impish
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • There lurked about him the impish quality of the whistle that had summoned her.

    The Coast of Chance Esther Chamberlain
  • She knew Jack could never feel the same to me, as the mother of that impish girl.

    A Soldier of the Legion C. N. Williamson
  • In such a life there is no place for untruthfulness or any member of its impish brood.

  • It was an impish trick, and it brought him unwittingly into peril of his soul.

    Harbor Tales Down North

    Norman Duncan
  • They could not reconcile it with the impish tricks she had played.

    The Huntress Hulbert Footner
  • An impish fear clutched my hand, so that I could not write any more that day.

    Story of My Life Helen Keller
British Dictionary definitions for impish

impish

/ˈɪmpɪʃ/
adjective
1.
of or resembling an imp; mischievous
Derived Forms
impishly, adverb
impishness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for impish
adj.

1650s, from imp + -ish. Related: Impishly; impishness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for impish

13
14
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