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2017 Word of the Year

incommunicado

[in-kuh-myoo-ni-kah-doh] /ˌɪn kəˌmyu nɪˈkɑ doʊ/
adjective
1.
(especially of a prisoner) deprived of any communication with others.
Origin of incommunicado
1835-1845
1835-45, Americanism; < Spanish incomunicado. See in-3, communicate
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for incommunicado
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I really was incommunicado so far as the outside world was concerned.

    The Road

    Jack London
  • If we could have, we'd have even Introverted the Maintainer, broken all the ties that bind us, chanced it incommunicado.

    The Big Time Fritz Reuter Leiber
  • The officers and privates were supposed to be strictly "incommunicado," but even these found means of communication.

    History of Kershaw's Brigade

    D. Augustus Dickert
British Dictionary definitions for incommunicado

incommunicado

/ˌɪnkəˌmjuːnɪˈkɑːdəʊ/
adverb, adjective
1.
(postpositive) deprived of communication with other people, as while in solitary confinement
Word Origin
C19: from Spanish incomunicado, from incomunicar to deprive of communication; see in-1, communicate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for incommunicado
adj./adv.

1844, American English, from Spanish incomunicado, past participle of incomunicar "deprive of communication," from in- "not" + comunicar "communicate," from Latin communicare "to share, impart" (see communication).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for incommunicado

22
29
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