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inflow

[in-floh] /ˈɪnˌfloʊ/
noun
1.
something that flows in; influx.
Origin of inflow
1645-1655
First recorded in 1645-55; in-1 + flow
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for inflow
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • This must be immediately closed to stop the inflow of water.

  • This gives rise to an outflow as well as an inflow of migrants.

  • It was only the inflow of the tide; and to escape from it would be easy enough.

    The Boy Slaves Mayne Reid
  • By pressing against the injured part it checked the inflow of water.

    The Giant of the North R.M. Ballantyne
  • In this attitude, and with trembling heart, I watched the inflow of the tide.

    The Boy Tar Mayne Reid
  • We give up nothing but that which impedes the inflow of godly forces.

    The Hive

    Will Levington Comfort
  • And when you both go to higher states, or you enter hers, a new life will inflow.

    Dawn Mrs. Harriet A. Adams
  • To arrive at any useful result we must compare the inflow with the outflow.

    Problems of Poverty John A. Hobson
British Dictionary definitions for inflow

inflow

/ˈɪnˌfləʊ/
noun
1.
something, such as a liquid or gas, that flows in
2.
the amount or rate of flowing in
3.
Also called inflowing. the act of flowing in; influx
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inflow
n.

1839, from in + flow (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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12
14
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