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knap1

[nap]
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noun British Dialect.
  1. a crest or summit of a small hill.
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Origin of knap1

before 1000; Middle English; Old English cnæpp top, summit; cognate with Old Norse knappr knob

knap2

[nap]
verb (used with or without object), knapped, knap·ping. Chiefly British Dialect.
  1. to strike smartly; rap.
  2. to break off abruptly.
  3. to chip or become chipped, as a flint or stone.
  4. to bite suddenly or quickly.
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Origin of knap2

1425–75; late Middle English; cognate with Dutch knap (noun), knappen (v.) crack; orig. imitative
Related formsknap·per, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for knap

Historical Examples

  • Knap, to break in two; also, to speak after the manner of the English.

    St. Ronan's Well

    Sir Walter Scott

  • Also, a blow or correction, as "you'll knap it," for some misdeed.

    The Sailor's Word-Book

    William Henry Smyth

  • But from a knap on the knee-pan I have known a man a lamiter for life.

  • It was Mrs. Knap who had the happy thought—the Peace Movement.

    Dry Fish and Wet

    Anthon Bernhard Elias Nilsen

  • "Really, I think he might have kept his remarks to himself," said Dr. Knap.

    Dry Fish and Wet

    Anthon Bernhard Elias Nilsen


British Dictionary definitions for knap

knap1

noun
  1. dialect the crest of a hill
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Word Origin

Old English cnæpp top; compare Old Norse knappr knob

knap2

verb knaps, knapping or knapped
  1. (tr) dialect to hit, hammer, or chip
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Derived Formsknapper, noun

Word Origin

C15 (in the sense: to strike with a sharp sound): of imitative origin; compare Dutch knappen to crack
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for knap

v.

"to strike with a sharp sound," late 15c., echoic. Earlier (c.1400) as a noun meaning "abrupt stroke." Related: Knapped; knapping.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper