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linguistics

[ling-gwis-tiks] /lɪŋˈgwɪs tɪks/
noun, (used with a singular verb)
1.
the science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics.
Origin of linguistics
1850-1855
First recorded in 1850-55; See origin at linguistic, -ics
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for linguistics
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • All such efforts are inconsistent with correct methods in linguistics.

  • Had not a "universal religion" better let linguistics alone?

    Bahaism and Its Claims Samuel Graham Wilson
  • A further proof of the antiquity of the migrations is afforded by linguistics.

    Man, Past and Present Agustus Henry Keane
  • Its scope was not restricted to the study of meteors, for it accepted papers on ethnology, linguistics, etc.

    The Jesuits, 1534-1921 Thomas J. Campbell
  • The labors of the two brothers, too numerous to cite here, concerned also ethnography and linguistics.

British Dictionary definitions for linguistics

linguistics

/lɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks/
noun
1.
(functioning as sing) the scientific study of language See also historical linguistics, descriptive linguistics
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for linguistics
n.

"the science of languages," 1847; see linguistic; also see -ics.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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