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mire

[mahyuh r] /maɪər/
noun
1.
a tract or area of wet, swampy ground; bog; marsh.
2.
ground of this kind, as wet, slimy soil of some depth or deep mud.
verb (used with object), mired, miring.
3.
to plunge and fix in mire; cause to stick fast in mire.
4.
to involve; entangle.
5.
to soil with mire; bespatter with mire.
verb (used without object), mired, miring.
6.
to sink in mire or mud; stick.
Origin of mire
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Old Norse mȳrr bog; cognate with Old English mēos moss
Related forms
unmired, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for mire
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • We found a good many dead, and several horses in the mire, but no wounded.

    Ned Myers James Fenimore Cooper
  • The effort we had to make at every step to get our feet out of the mire tired us out.

    My Double Life Sarah Bernhardt
  • You think he's on your side, and suddenly he splashes you with mire!

  • Some, in their panic, leaped out into the shallow water and sunk in the mire.

  • The stove, with its perspective all awry, was tame and precise, and in colour as dingy as mire.

    His Masterpiece Emile Zola
  • And the sow that was washed, she went wallerin' in the mire, first chance she got.

    Old Man Curry

    Charles E. (Charles Emmett) Van Loan
  • And the whiter the soul that is dragged through that—that mire, the more the defilement.

    The Christian Hall Caine
  • Alas, her vicious brood have turned on her and cast her ribbons in the mire!

    The Strollers Frederic S. Isham
British Dictionary definitions for mire

mire

/maɪə/
noun
1.
a boggy or marshy area
2.
mud, muck, or dirt
verb
3.
to sink or cause to sink in a mire
4.
(transitive) to make dirty or muddy
5.
(transitive) to involve, esp in difficulties
Derived Forms
miriness, noun
miry, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old Norse mӯrr; related to moss
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mire
n.

c.1300, from a Scandinavian source (cf. Old Norse myrr "bog, swamp"), from Proto-Germanic *miuzja- (cf. Old English mos "bog, marsh"), from PIE *meus- "damp" (see moss).

v.

c.1400, in figurative sense of "to involve in difficulties," from mire (n.). Literal sense is from 1550s. Related: Mired; miring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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mire in Medicine

mire (mēr)
n.
Any of the test objects on the arm of a keratometer whose image, as reflected on the curved surface of the cornea, is used in calculating the amount of astigmatism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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