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moonlit

[moon-lit] /ˈmunˌlɪt/
adjective
1.
lighted by the moon.
Origin of moonlit
1820-1830
First recorded in 1820-30; moon + lit1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for moonlit
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Upon looking around the moonlit room I found that I was alone.

    Biography of a Slave Charles Thompson
  • "I think that I can see them yet," said Ford, peering down the moonlit road.

    The White Company Arthur Conan Doyle
  • So that is why you have been lying so quiet under the trees these moonlit nights!

    Buried Cities, Part 2 Jennie Hall
  • Yet she did not go to the window to look into the moonlit night.

    Tiverton Tales Alice Brown
  • Through the trees the mouth of the alley could be seen, opening out on a moonlit glade.

    White Fang Jack London
  • He passed out of the forest and into the moonlit open where were no shadows nor darknesses.

    White Fang Jack London
  • I followed, not into the moonlit night, but through a cavernous opening into darkness.

    Wilfrid Cumbermede George MacDonald
  • And then, in the evening, were moonlit walks with Mrs. Felix Lorraine!

    Vivian Grey Earl of Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli
British Dictionary definitions for moonlit

moonlit

/ˈmuːnlɪt/
adjective
1.
illuminated by the moon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for moonlit
adj.

1830 (first attested in Tennyson), from moon (n.) + lit.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for moonlit

9
12
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