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next-door

[adverb neks-dawr, -dohr, nekst-; adjective neks-dawr, -dohr, nekst-] /adverb ˈnɛksˈdɔr, -ˈdoʊr, ˈnɛkst-; adjective ˈnɛksˌdɔr, -ˌdoʊr, ˈnɛkst-/
adverb
1.
Also, next door. to, at, or in the next house on the street, especially if it is very close by, or the adjacent apartment, office, room, or the like:
Go next-door and get your sister. Your sister is next-door. Her brother lives next-door.
adjective
2.
being situated or living next-door:
next-door neighbors.
Origin of next-door
1475-1485
1475-85
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for next-door
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It was mother, Mrs. Thrifty, our next-door neighbor, and the doctor.

  • Have they not been next-door neighbours from the infancy of the world?

    This Giddy Globe Oliver Herford
  • With no delay Hewitt transferred himself to the next-door offices.

    The Red Triangle Arthur Morrison
  • So we did, first glancing up at the next-door balcony, to see if the parrot was there.

    Peterkin Mary Louisa Molesworth
  • Mrs. Arley he knew, and her motor-car had recently made her a next-door neighbor in spite of the thirty miles between them.

    The Shadow of Life Anne Douglas Sedgwick
Word Origin and History for next-door
adv.

also nextdoor, 1570s, from noun phrase next door "nearest house" (late 15c.), from next + door. Noun meaning "the people living next door" is from 1855.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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