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objurgate

[ob-jer-geyt, uh b-jur-geyt]
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verb (used with object), ob·jur·gat·ed, ob·jur·gat·ing.
  1. to reproach or denounce vehemently; upbraid harshly; berate sharply.
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Origin of objurgate

1610–20; < Latin objūrgātus, past participle of objūrgāre to rebuke, equivalent to ob- ob- + jūrgāre, jurigāre to rebuke, equivalent to jūr- (stem of jūs) law + -ig-, combining form of agere to drive, do + -ātus -ate1
Related formsob·jur·ga·tion, nounob·jur·ga·tor, nounob·jur·ga·to·ri·ly [uh b-jur-guh-tawr-uh-lee, -tohr-] /əbˈdʒɜr gəˌtɔr ə li, -ˌtoʊr-/, ob·jur·ga·tive·ly, adverbob·jur·ga·to·ry, ob·jur·ga·tive, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for objurgate

Historical Examples

  • If you step on one after nightfall, it will be useless to objurgate.

    A Breeze from the Woods, 2nd Ed.

    William Chauncey Bartlett


British Dictionary definitions for objurgate

objurgate

verb
  1. (tr) to scold or reprimand
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Derived Formsobjurgation, nounobjurgator, nounobjurgatory (ɒbˈdʒɜːɡətərɪ, -trɪ) or objurgative, adjective

Word Origin

C17: from Latin objurgāre, from ob- against + jurgāre to scold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for objurgate

v.

1610s, from Latin obiurgatus, past participle of obiurgare "to chide, rebuke," from ob- (see ob-) + iurgare "to quarrel, scold," from phrase iure agere "to deal in a lawsuit," from ablative of ius "right; law; suit" (see just (adj.)) + agere "to do, act, set in motion" (see act (n.)). Related: Objurgatory.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper