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Octavian

[ok-tey-vee-uh n] /ɒkˈteɪ vi ən/
noun
1.

John XII

noun
1.
(Octavian) died a.d. 964, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 955–964.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Octavian
Historical Examples
  • Two versions of Octavian read, the one "in books of Rome," the other "in books of ryme."

  • And the emblems were those of Octavian, and of the other those of Cleopatra and Antony.

    Cleopatra H. Rider Haggard
  • He then returns to the subject of Octavian, and his doubts as to his loyalty.

    The Life of Cicero Anthony Trollope
  • With eloquent words he praises Octavian and the two legions and Decimus.

    The Life of Cicero Anthony Trollope
  • But for the commanders, Octavian and his able lieutenant, there was nothing to regret.

    Famous Sea Fights John Richard Hale
  • The victor Octavian had already taken the name of his grand-uncle, Cæsar.

    Famous Sea Fights John Richard Hale
  • A few had voted for Octavian, and some also for Magister Bernard.

  • They also abound in the scene between Octavian and Lerchenan in the third act.

  • Octavian is loath to go, the Princess, equally loather to have him depart.

  • To rid himself of annoyance by them, Octavian needed all the help he could get.

    Under Csars' Shadow Henry Francis Colby
British Dictionary definitions for Octavian

Octavian

/ɒkˈteɪvɪən/
noun
1.
the name of Augustus before he became emperor (27 bc) See Augustus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Octavian

masc. proper name, from Latin, from Octavius, from octavus "eighth," from octo (see eight).

But although we find so marked differences in the use of the numerals as names, it is impossible to believe that this use did not arise in the same way for all; that is, that they were at first used to distinguish children by the order of birth. But when we find them as praenomina in historical times it is evident that they no longer referred to order of birth. [George Davis Chase, "The Origin of Roman Praenomina," "Harvard Studies in Classical Philology," 1897]

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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