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Phaedrus

[fee-druh s, fed-ruh s] /ˈfi drəs, ˈfɛd rəs/
noun
1.
flourished a.d. c40, Roman writer of fables.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for Phaedrus
Historical Examples
  • The local arrangement of the vision is less distinct than that of the Phaedrus and Phaedo.

    The Republic Plato
  • Therefore, Phaedrus, bid him do at once what he will soon do whether bidden or not.

    Phaedrus Plato
  • And so, Phaedrus, you really imagine that I am going to improve upon the ingenuity of Lysias?

    Phaedrus Plato
  • If genuine, the proper place of the Menexenus would be at the end of the Phaedrus.

    Menexenus Plato
  • This is speedily repressed by Phaedrus, who reminds the disputants of their tribute to the god.

    Symposium Plato
  • There are no means of determining the relative order in time of the Phaedrus, Symposium, Phaedo.

    Symposium Plato
  • Let Phaedrus begin the praise of Love, and good luck to him.

    Symposium Plato
  • Many threads join together in one the love and dialectic of the Phaedrus.

    Parmenides Plato
  • They remind us of the Timaeus, as well as of the Phaedrus and Philebus.

    Timaeus Plato
  • When he calls the centre of the world (Greek), we have a parallel to the Phaedrus.

    Timaeus Plato
British Dictionary definitions for Phaedrus

Phaedrus

/ˈfiːdrəs/
noun
1.
?15 bc–?50 ad, Roman author of five books of Latin verse fables, based chiefly on Aesop
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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