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prepositional phrase

noun, Grammar.
1.
a phrase consisting of a preposition, its object, which is usually a noun or a pronoun, and any modifiers of the object, as in the gray desk I use.
Origin of prepositional phrase
1960-1965
First recorded in 1960-65
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for prepositional phrase
Historical Examples
  • An adjective phrase is a prepositional phrase used as an adjective.

    Plain English

    Marian Wharton
  • An adverb phrase is a prepositional phrase used as an adverb.

    Plain English

    Marian Wharton
  • A prepositional phrase may be either adjective or adverbial.

  • A phrase consisting of a preposition and its object, with or without other words, is called a prepositional phrase.

  • This use is due to the fact that the infinitive with to is really a prepositional phrase ( 42).

  • In these sentences, the indirect object me, being equivalent to a prepositional phrase, is an adverbial modifier.

  • If it deserves more notice, perhaps a prepositional phrase will express it.

    English: Composition and Literature

    W. F. (William Franklin) Webster
  • The preposition, with its object and the modifiers of the object, forms a phrase which we call a prepositional phrase.

    Plain English

    Marian Wharton
  • A prepositional phrase is a phrase composed of a preposition and its object and modifiers.

    Plain English

    Marian Wharton
  • And we can also use the prepositional phrase to express relationship which we cannot express by a single adjective or adverb.

    Plain English

    Marian Wharton

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Word Value for prepositional

17
21
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