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2017 Word of the Year

primavera1

[pree-muh-vair-uh] /ˌpri məˈvɛər ə/
noun
1.
a central American tree, Cybistax donnell-smithii, of the bignonia family, having showy, tubular yellow flowers.
2.
Also called white mahogany. the hard, yellowish-white wood of this tree, used for making furniture.
Origin of primavera1
1890-1895
1890-95; < Spanish: literally, spring; so called from its early flowering; see primaveral

primavera2

[pree-muh-vair-uh; Italian pree-mah-ve-rah] /ˌpri məˈvɛər ə; Italian ˌpri mɑˈvɛ rɑ/
adjective, Italian Cookery.
1.
prepared with a variety of chopped or minced vegetables:
pasta primavera.
Origin
apparently ellipsis from Italian alla primavera in the style of springtime; see primaveral
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for primavera
Historical Examples
  • It is primavera—the primavera of the Italy of Parma violets and lush red roses.

    Dust of New York Konrad Bercovici
  • Has he not spoken of the festas and the jousts, and the rare encounters that in Naples greeted primavera?

  • It is a hunter who informs the father of the love of his daughter and the count in one of the romances, primavera, II, 362.

  • He stopped, his hand on the trunk of a primavera tree and waited for the man to approach.

    When the Owl Cries Paul Bartlett
  • The primavera or “spring fabric” was so named from the flowers which adorned it.

  • Another bird, the primavera, seems to be like our mockingbird, imitating the notes and cries of many other birds and animals.

    In Indian Mexico (1908) Frederick Starr
  • primavera concluded the tour of inspection, and by some primavera herself was thought to be not unlike Jenny.

    Carnival Compton Mackenzie
  • She reminded him, even more than was usual, of the faces of some of the women created by the painter of the primavera.'

    Swann's Way Marcel Proust
  • So when he was asked for a name for the new street he replied gallantly, 'primavera, of course, for Mi primavera.'

    Spring Street James H. Richardson
  • "primavera, for instance," Wedderburn suggested, and Michael's heart beat in sympathy.

    Sinister Street, vol. 2 Compton Mackenzie
Word Origin and History for primavera
n.

"spring, spring time," Italian, from Latin prima vera, plural of primus ver literally "first spring;" see prime (adj.) + vernal. Related: Primaveral.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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