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sickening

[sik-uh-ning] /ˈsɪk ə nɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing or capable of causing sickness, especially nausea, disgust, or loathing:
sickening arrogance.
Origin of sickening
1715-1725
First recorded in 1715-25; sicken + -ing2
Related forms
sickeningly, adverb
Synonyms
nauseating, disgusting, loathsome.

sicken

[sik-uh n] /ˈsɪk ən/
verb (used with or without object)
1.
to make or become sick.
Origin
1150-1200; Middle English seknen, sicnen; cognate with Old Norse sjūkna. See sick1, -en1
Related forms
resicken, verb
unsickened, adjective
Synonyms
repulse, revolt, disgust, upset.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for sickening
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • When I last wrote, on the Somme in 1915, I was sickening with typhoid fever.

    Ballads of a Bohemian Robert W. Service
  • A sickening conviction came that it was the dreaded influenza.

    Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser
  • I had read the "Extra," with all its sickening details, and so handed it back to him.

    The Underdog F. Hopkinson Smith
  • It was sickening to see, because I knew what was going to happen.

    American Notes Rudyard Kipling
  • Such symptoms, when a disease of the kind is rife, are usually the signs of sickening.

    Little Dorrit Charles Dickens
British Dictionary definitions for sickening

sickening

/ˈsɪkənɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing sickness or revulsion
2.
(informal) extremely annoying
Derived Forms
sickeningly, adverb

sicken

/ˈsɪkən/
verb
1.
to make or become sick, nauseated, or disgusted
2.
(intransitive) often foll by for. to show symptoms (of an illness)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sickening
adj.

"falling sick," 1725; "causing revulsion, disgust, or nausea," 1789, present participle adjective from sicken. Related: Sickeningly.

sicken

v.

c.1200, "to become ill," from sick (adj.) + -en (1). Transitive sense of "to make sick" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Sickened; sickening. The earlier verb was simply sick (Old English seocan) "to be ill, fall ill."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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