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2017 Word of the Year

stodge

[stoj] /stɒdʒ/
verb (used with object), stodged, stodging.
1.
to stuff full, especially with food or drink; gorge.
verb (used without object), stodged, stodging.
2.
to trudge:
to stodge along through the mire.
noun
3.
food that is particularly filling.
Origin of stodge
1665-1675
1665-75; origin uncertain; in some senses perhaps blend of stoff (earlier form of stuff) and gorge1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for stodge
Historical Examples
  • He grabs the Leader and leaves me to stodge myself with his Times.

    Man And Superman George Bernard Shaw
  • No harm done; but to let him go on here in the stodge is a bit of short-sightedness I can't understand.

  • It was for the good of Felix, and everyone else, that they should not all hang about at home in the stodge and mire.

  • From the beginning to the end of that list my mind is obsessed by the word 'stodge,' and the novels do not relieve it much.

    A Novelist on Novels W. L. George
  • I ken bear a good big blow, but to stodge along every day the same dull round would drive me crazed!

    Flaming June Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey
British Dictionary definitions for stodge

stodge

/stɒdʒ/
noun
1.
heavy filling starchy food
2.
(dialect, mainly Southern English) baked or steamed pudding
3.
a dull person or subject
verb
4.
to stuff (oneself or another) with food
Word Origin
C17: perhaps a blend of stuff + podge
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Value for stodge

8
9
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