Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

What is Ghosting?

sub

[suhb] /sʌb/ Informal.
noun
1.
a submarine.
2.
a substitute.
3.
a submarine sandwich. See hero sandwich.
4.
a subcontractor.
5.
a sublieutenant.
6.
a subordinate.
7.
a subaltern.
8.
British. an advance against one's wages, especially one granted as a subsistence allowance.
9.
Photography. a substratum.
verb (used without object), subbed, subbing.
10.
to act as a substitute for another.
verb (used with object), subbed, subbing.
11.
Photography. to coat (a film or plate) with a substratum.
Origin of sub
by shortening of words prefixed with sub-
Regional variation note
3. See hero sandwich.

SUB

1.
supplemental unemployment benefits.

sub-

1.
a prefix occurring originally in loanwords from Latin (subject; subtract; subvert; subsidy); on this model, freely attached to elements of any origin and used with the meaning “under,” “below,” “beneath” (subalpine; substratum), “slightly,” “imperfectly,” “nearly” (subcolumnar; subtropical), “secondary,” “subordinate” (subcommittee; subplot).
2.
Chemistry.
  1. a prefix indicating a basic compound:
    subacetate; subcarbonate; subnitrate.
  2. a prefix indicating that the element is present in a relatively small proportion, i.e., in a low oxidation state:
    subchloride; suboxide.
Also, su-, suc-, suf-, sug-, sum-, sup-, sur-, sus-.
Origin
< Latin, combining form representing sub (preposition); akin to Greek hypó; see hypo-

sub.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for sub
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • sub, to draw money in advance; a term in use among workmen generally, and those with casual employment in particular.

    The Slang Dictionary John Camden Hotten
  • It was only that I tried to save the life of a sub who'd just joined—and didn't.

    The Hero William Somerset Maugham
  • As the small boats were floating around, the sub came to the surface and took someone from one of the boats aboard.

    Bill Bruce on Forest Patrol Henry Harley Arnold
  • There are four other beetleheads on the sub and they carry disintegrators.

    Operation Earthworm Joe Archibald
  • sub intimatione anathematis prohibentes ne dictus rex eam observare prsumat.

British Dictionary definitions for sub

sub

/sʌb/
noun
1.
short for several words beginning with sub- See subaltern, subeditor, submarine, subordinate, subscription, substandard, substitute, substratum (sense 6)
2.
(Brit, informal) an advance payment of wages or salary Formal term subsistence allowance
verb subs, subbing, subbed
3.
(intransitive) to serve as a substitute
4.
(intransitive) (informal) to act as a substitute (for)
5.
(Brit, informal) to grant or receive (an advance payment of wages or salary)
6.
(transitive) (informal) short for subedit
7.
(transitive) (photog) to apply a substratum to (a film or plate base)

sub-

prefix
1.
situated under or beneath: subterranean
2.
secondary in rank; subordinate: subeditor
3.
falling short of; less than or imperfectly: subarctic, subhuman
4.
forming a subdivision or subordinate part of a whole: subcommittee
5.
(in chemistry)
  1. indicating that a compound contains a relatively small proportion of a specified element: suboxide
  2. indicating that a salt is basic salt: subacetate
Word Origin
from Latin sub

sub.

abbreviation
1.
subeditor
2.
subito (in music)
3.
subscription
4.
substitute
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for sub
n.

shortened form of substitute, 1830; the verb in this sense is from 1853. Related: Subbed; subbing. From 1917 as short for submarine (n.).

sub-

word-forming element meaning "under," from Latin preposition sub "under" (also "close to, up to, towards"), from a variant form (*(s)up-, perhaps representing *ex-upo-) of PIE root *upo- "from below," hence "turning upward, upward, up, up from under, over, beyond" (cf. Sanskrit upa "near, under, up to, on," Greek hypo "under," Gothic iup, Old Norse, Old English upp "up, upward," Hittite up-zi "rises"). Used as a prefix and in various combinations.

The original meaning is now obscured in many words from Latin ( suggest, suspect, subject, etc.). The prefix is active in Modern English, sometimes meaning "subordinate" (as in subcontinent, first recorded 1863) or "inferior" (a sense first attested 1963).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
sub in Medicine

sub- pref.

  1. Below; under; beneath: subcutaneous.

  2. Subordinate; secondary: subinfection.

  3. Subdivision: subkingdom.

  4. Less than completely or normally; nearly; almost: subfertility.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
sub in Science
sub-  
A prefix that means "underneath or lower" (as in subsoil), "a subordinate or secondary part of something else" (as in subphylum.), or "less than completely" (as in subtropical.)
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Slang definitions & phrases for sub

sub

noun

A substitute of any sort, esp an athlete who replaces another or an athlete not on the first team (1830+)

verb

: Who'll sub for me when I go on leave? (1853+)

sub

-prefix

for forming adjectives Inferior to or imitative of what is indicated: sub–Woody Allen (1963+)

submarine sandwich

n phr,n

hero sandwich • Also hoagy, torpedo, grinder, poor boy, etc depending on the locality

[1960s+; fr the shape of the bread cut lengthwise for the sandwich]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
Cite This Source
sub in Technology
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source
Related Abbreviations for sub

sub

1.
submarine
2.
substitute

sub.

1.
subaltern
2.
suburb
3.
suburban
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for sub

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for sub

5
7
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for sub