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trine

[trahyn]
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adjective
  1. threefold; triple.
  2. Astrology. of or relating to the trigon aspect of two planets distant from each other 120°, or the third part of the zodiac.
noun
  1. a set or group of three; triad.
  2. (initial capital letter) the Trinity.
  3. Astrology. a trine aspect of two planets, indicative of ease and accomplishment.

Origin of trine

1350–1400; Middle English: threefold (< Old French trin(e)) < Latin trīnus, singular of trīnī by threes (see trinary)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for trine

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Old Trine stood behind the baker's boy, and her big basket was at her feet.

    Rico and Wiseli

    Johanna Spyri

  • Your wife can have her Trine back again; and tell her she was worth her weight in gold.

    Rico and Wiseli

    Johanna Spyri

  • "I am going to take Trine away, now that you are so well," began Mrs. Ritter.

    Rico and Wiseli

    Johanna Spyri

  • No one was there; but it was in good order, as old Trine had left it when she went away.

    Rico and Wiseli

    Johanna Spyri

  • There John saw his father and mother, and his brother Andrew, and his sister Trine.

    The Fairy Mythology

    Thomas Keightley


British Dictionary definitions for trine

trine

noun
  1. astrology an aspect of 120° between two planets, an orb of 8° being allowedCompare conjunction (def. 5), opposition (def. 9), square (def. 10)
  2. anything comprising three parts
adjective
  1. of or relating to a trine
  2. threefold; triple
Derived Formstrinal, adjective

Word Origin

C14: from Old French trin, from Latin trīnus triple, from trēs three
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for trine

adj.

"threefold," late 14c., from French trine (13c.), from Latin trinus "threefold," from tres "three" (see three).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper