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undergo

[uhn-der-goh] /ˌʌn dərˈgoʊ/
verb (used with object), underwent, undergone, undergoing.
1.
to be subjected to; experience; pass through:
to undergo surgery.
2.
to endure; sustain; suffer:
to undergo sustained deprivation.
Origin of undergo
1000
before 1000; Middle English undergon, Old English undergān. See under-, go1
Related forms
undergoer, noun
Synonyms
1. See experience. 2. bear, tolerate.
Antonyms
1. avoid.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for undergo
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He felt a brute, but he knew that she must undergo an examination at the hands of men who had less regard for her feelings.

    The Daffodil Mystery Edgar Wallace
  • Hence they undergo improvement and are made consistent with each other.

    Folkways William Graham Sumner
  • Well, is it not clear that the like must be true concerning all things that undergo development?

  • He had to undergo a court-martial for the loss of the Flash.

    The Three Commanders W.H.G. Kingston
  • He had the Somali's love of a rupee, and there was no danger or hardship that he would not undergo in the hope of backsheesh.

    In Africa John T. McCutcheon
British Dictionary definitions for undergo

undergo

/ˌʌndəˈɡəʊ/
verb -goes, -going, -went, -gone
1.
(transitive) to experience, endure, or sustain: to undergo a dramatic change of feelings
Derived Forms
undergoer, noun
Word Origin
Old English: earlier meanings were more closely linked with the senses of under and go
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for undergo
v.

Old English undergan "undermine," from under + gan (see go). Cf. Middle Dutch ondergaen, Old High German untarkun, German untergehen, Danish undergaa. Sense of "submit to, endure" is attested from c.1300. Meaning "to pass through" (an alteration, etc.) is attested from 1630s. Related: Undergone; underwent.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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