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yore

[yawr, yohr] /yɔr, yoʊr/
noun
1.
Chiefly Literary. time past:
knights of yore.
adverb
2.
Obsolete. of old; long ago.
Origin of yore
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English geāra
Can be confused
yore, your, you're.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for yore
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • To sing praises as Aneurin of yore, The day he sang the Gododin.

    Y Gododin Aneurin
  • He no longer treated Bongrand in the wheedling, respectful manner of yore.

    His Masterpiece Emile Zola
  • They wanted to see their table of yore, on the left hand, right at the back of the room.

    His Masterpiece Emile Zola
  • In making speeches he does not speak as boldly, as directly as in days of yore.

    Blood and Iron John Hubert Greusel
  • A very good time it was, cattle selling higher than of yore.

    Ireland as It Is Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
British Dictionary definitions for yore

yore

/jɔː/
noun
1.
time long past (now only in the phrase of yore)
adverb
2.
(obsolete) in the past; long ago
Word Origin
Old English geāra, genitive plural of gēaryear; see hour
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for yore

Old English geara (adv.) "of yore," originally genitive plural of gear (see year), and used without of.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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7
6
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