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-dermatous

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a combining form meaning “skinned,” “possessing skin,” used to form compound words in which the initial element specifies the type of skin: xerodermatous.
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Compare -derm.

Origin of -dermatous

<Greek -dermatos, adj. derivative of dérma, stem dermat- skin; see -ous
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

WORDS THAT USE -DERMATOUS

What does -dermatous mean?

The combining form -dermatous is used like a suffix meaning “skinned” or “possessing skin” of a kind specified by the first type of the first part of the word. It is often used in some medical and scientific terms. In some instances, -dermatous is used as an adjective form of nouns ending in -derm or -derma.

The form –dermatous ultimately comes from the Greek dérma, meaning “skin.”

Closely related to -dermatous are the combining forms -derm, -derma, -dermis, dermat-, dermato-, derm-, and dermo-. Learn their specific applications in our Words That Use articles for these forms.

Examples of -dermatous

One example of a term that features –dermatous is sclerodermatous, “covered with a hardened tissue, as scales.”

The first part of the word, sclero-, means “hard.” The form –dermatous means, as we’ve seen, “skinned.” Sclerodermatous literally translates to “hard-skinned.”

What are some words that use the combining form –dermatous?

What are some other forms that –dermatous may be commonly confused with?

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Pachydermatous is sometimes used as an adjective form of pachyderm, which can refer to animals like elephants and rhinos or, figuratively, people who are not sensitive to criticism.

Given that pachy- means “thick,” what does pachydermatous literally translate to?

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