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View synonyms for nap

nap

1

[ nap ]

verb (used without object)

, napped, nap·ping.
  1. to sleep for a short time; doze.

    Synonyms: catnap, rest, nod

  2. to be off one's guard:

    The question caught him napping.



verb (used with object)

, napped, nap·ping.
  1. to sleep or doze through (a period of time, an activity, etc.) (usually followed by away ):

    I napped the afternoon away. He naps away most of his classes.

noun

  1. a brief period of sleep, especially one taken during daytime:

    Has the baby had her nap?

nap

2

[ nap ]

noun

  1. the short fuzzy ends of fibers on the surface of cloth, drawn up in napping.
  2. any downy coating, as on plants.

verb (used with object)

, napped, nap·ping.
  1. to raise a nap on.

nap

3

[ nap ]

-nap

4
  1. a combining form extracted from kidnap, with the general sense “abduct or steal in order to collect a ransom”:

    artnap; petnap; starnap.

nap

1

/ næp /

noun

    1. the raised fibres of velvet or similar cloth
    2. the direction in which these fibres lie when smoothed down
  1. any similar downy coating
  2. informal.
    blankets, bedding


verb

  1. tr to raise the nap of (cloth, esp velvet) by brushing or similar treatment

nap

2

/ næp /

verb

  1. to sleep for a short while; doze
  2. to be unaware or inattentive; be off guard (esp in the phrase catch someone napping )

noun

  1. a short light sleep; doze

nap

3

/ næp /

noun

  1. Also callednapoleon a card game similar to whist, usually played for stakes
  2. a call in this card game, undertaking to win all five tricks
  3. horse racing a tipster's choice for an almost certain winner
  4. go nap
    go nap
    1. to undertake to win all five tricks at nap
    2. to risk everything on one chance
  5. not to go nap on slang.
    not to go nap on to hold in disfavour
  6. nap hand
    nap hand a position in which there is a very good chance of success if a risk is taken

verb

  1. tr horse racing to name (a horse) as likely to win a race

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Other Words From

  • napless adjective
  • napless·ness noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of nap1

First recorded before 900; Middle English verb nappen, Old English hnappian, hnæppian “to sleep, slumber, doze”; cognate with Old High German (h)naffezen, Middle High German, German nafzen “to slumber”

Origin of nap2

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English noppe, nop(e); probably from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, nop, noppe; possibly from Old English (wull)hnoppa “(wool) tuft, tuft”

Origin of nap3

First recorded in 1820–25; shortened form of napoleon

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Word History and Origins

Origin of nap1

C15: probably from Middle Dutch noppe; related to Old English hnoppian to pluck

Origin of nap2

Old English hnappian; related to Middle High German napfen

Origin of nap3

C19: short for napoleon , the original name of the card game

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Example Sentences

You would drink it, then “take a little nap and after that you feel wonderful,” according to a press agent.

Perhaps he had been feeding off the relative youth of Paul, who appeared in need of a long nap by this point.

Researchers have found that a long nap — of two hours or more — can significantly improve alertness for up to 24 hours.

Nap Smarter So how do you make the most of your precious nap-time minutes?

A “caffeine nap,” or a quick cup of something caffeinated followed by a nap, outperforms both a nap or caffeine independently.

He ate as many as he wanted and then, as he always felt sleepy after he had eaten, he thought he would lie down and have a nap.

Then came dinner and a nap under the trees until the late afternoon, when work began again.

However, when the church-bells began, she was turning round in her warm bed for another nap.

When it was time for him to have a nap, and mamma went to call him, she noticed that a great many of the dandelions were gone.

He found his judge awakening from a nap before his library fire and dusting the crumbs from his beard.

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