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-ous

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a suffix forming adjectives that have the general sense “possessing, full of” a given quality (covetous; glorious; nervous; wondrous); -ous and its variant -ious have often been used to Anglicize Latin adjectives with terminations that cannot be directly adapted into English (atrocious; contiguous; garrulous; obvious; stupendous). As an adjective-forming suffix of neutral value, it regularly Anglicizes Greek and Latin adjectives derived without suffix from nouns and verbs; many such formations are productive combining forms in English, sometimes with a corresponding nominal combining form that has no suffix;Compare -fer, -ferous; -phore, -phorous; -pter, -pterous; -vore, -vorous.
a suffix forming adjectival correspondents to the names of chemical elements; specialized, in opposition to like adjectives ending in -ic, to mean the lower of two possible valences (stannous chloride, SnCl2, and stannic chloride SnCl4).
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Origin of -ous

Middle English <Anglo-French, Old French <Latin -ōsus; a doublet of -ose1

Words nearby -ous

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use -ous in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for -ous

-ous

suffix forming adjectives
having, full of, or characterized bydangerous; spacious; languorous
(in chemistry) indicating that an element is chemically combined in the lower of two possible valency statesferrous; stannous Compare -ic (def. 2)

Word Origin for -ous

from Old French, from Latin -ōsus or -us, Greek -os, adj suffixes
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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