abduction

1
[ ab-duhk-shuh n ]
/ æbˈdʌk ʃən /

noun

act of abducting.
the state of being abducted.
Law. the illegal carrying or enticing away of a person, especially by interfering with a relationship, as the taking of a child from its parent.

Nearby words

  1. abducens oculi,
  2. abducent,
  3. abducent nerve,
  4. abduct,
  5. abductee,
  6. abductor,
  7. abductor muscle of big toe,
  8. abductor muscle of little finger,
  9. abductor muscle of little toe,
  10. abdul rahman

Origin of abduction

1
First recorded in 1620–30; abduct + -ion

abduction

2
[ ab-duhk-shuh n ]
/ æbˈdʌk ʃən /

noun Logic.

a syllogism whose major premise is certain but whose minor premise is probable.

Origin of abduction

2
First recorded in 1690–1700, abduction is from the New Latin word abductiōn- (stem of abductiō; translation of Greek apagōgḗ). See abduct, -ion

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for abduction


British Dictionary definitions for abduction

abduction

/ (æbˈdʌkʃən) /

noun

the act of taking someone away by force or cunning; kidnapping
the action of certain muscles in pulling a leg, arm, etc away from the median axis of the body
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for abduction

abduction

n.

1620s, "a leading away," from Latin abductionem (nominative abductio), noun of action from past participle stem of abducere "to lead away, take away" (often by force), from ab- "away" (see ab-) + ducere "to lead" (see duke (n.)). The illegal activity so called from 1768; before that the word also was a term in surgery and logic. In the Mercian hymns, Latin abductione is glossed by Old English wiðlaednisse.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper