ablative

1
[ ab-luh-tiv ]
/ ˈæb lə tɪv /
Grammar

adjective

(in some inflected languages) noting a case that has among its functions the indication of place from which or, as in Latin, place in which, manner, means, instrument, or agent.

noun

the ablative case. Abbreviation: abl.
a word in that case, as Troiā in Latin Aenēas Troiā vēnit, “Aeneas came from Troy.”

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Origin of ablative

1
First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English word from Latin word ablātīvus.See ablate, -ive

OTHER WORDS FROM ablative

ab·la·ti·val [ab-luh-tahy-vuhl], /ˌæb ləˈtaɪ vəl/, adjective

Definition for ablative (2 of 2)

ablative2
[ a-bley-tiv ]
/ æˈbleɪ tɪv /

adjective

capable of or susceptible to ablation; tending to ablate: the ablative nose cone of a rocket.

Origin of ablative

2
First recorded in 1560–70; ablate + -ive

OTHER WORDS FROM ablative

ab·la·tive·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for ablative

British Dictionary definitions for ablative

ablative
/ (ˈæblətɪv) grammar /

adjective

(in certain inflected languages such as Latin) denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives indicating the agent in passive sentences or the instrument, manner, or place of the action described by the verb

noun

  1. the ablative case
  2. a word or speech element in the ablative case
taking away or removingablative surgery
able to disintegrate or be worn away at a very high temperaturea thick layer of ablative material
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012