abolish

[ uh-bol-ish ]
/ əˈbɒl ɪʃ /

verb (used with object)

to do away with; put an end to; annul; make void: to abolish slavery.

Origin of abolish

1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French aboliss-, long stem of abolir < Latin abolēre to destroy, efface, put an end to; change of conjugation perhaps by association with Latin abolitiō abolition

Related forms

Synonym study

Abolish, eradicate, stamp out mean to do away completely with something. To abolish is to cause to cease, often by a summary order: to abolish a requirement. Stamp out implies forcibly making an end to something considered undesirable or harmful: to stamp out the opium traffic. Eradicate (literally, to tear out by the roots ), a formal word, suggests extirpation, leaving no vestige or trace: to eradicate all use of child labor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for abolish

British Dictionary definitions for abolish

abolish

/ (əˈbɒlɪʃ) /

verb

(tr) to do away with (laws, regulations, customs, etc); put an end to

Derived Forms

abolishable, adjectiveabolisher, nounabolishment, noun

Word Origin for abolish

C15: from Old French aboliss- (lengthened stem of abolir), ultimately from Latin abolēre to destroy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012