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abomination

[uh-bom-uh-ney-shuhn]
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noun
  1. anything abominable; anything greatly disliked or abhorred.
  2. intense aversion or loathing; detestation: He regarded lying with abomination.
  3. a vile, shameful, or detestable action, condition, habit, etc.: Spitting in public is an abomination.
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Origin of abomination

1350–1400; Middle English ab(h)ominacioun < Late Latin abōminātiōn- (stem of abōminātiō). See abominate, -ion
Related formsself-a·bom·i·na·tion, nounsu·per·a·bom·i·na·tion, noun

Synonyms for abomination

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for abomination

curse, horror, detestation, anathema, evil, shame, plague, aversion, torment, nuisance, bother, offense, wrong, crime

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Contemporary Examples of abomination

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British Dictionary definitions for abomination

abomination

noun
  1. a person or thing that is disgusting
  2. an action that is vicious, vile, etc
  3. intense loathing
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for abomination

n.

early 14c., "abominable thing or action;" late 14c., "feeling of disgust, hatred, loathing," from Old French abominacion "abomination, horror, repugnance, disgust" (13c.), from Latin abominationem (nominative abominatio) "abomination," noun of action from past participle stem of abominari "shun as an ill omen," from ab- "off, away from" (see ab-) + omin-, stem of omen (see omen). Meaning intensified by folk etymology derivation from Latin ab homine "away from man," thus "beastly."

Doubtless, the life of an Irregular is hard; but the interests of the Greater Number require that it shall be hard. If a man with a triangular front and a polygonal back were allowed to exist and to propagate a still more Irregular posterity, what would become of the arts of life? Are the houses and doors and churches in Flatland to be altered in order to accommodate such monsters? [Edwin Abbot, "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions," 1885]
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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper