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abraxas

[ uh-brak-suhs ]
/ əˈbræk səs /
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noun
a word of unknown significance found on charms, especially amulets, of the late Greco-Roman world and linked with both Gnostic beliefs and magical practices by the early church fathers.
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Origin of abraxas

First recorded in 1710–20; from Greek word abráxas, abrásax, abrasáx, of obscure origin; the combined numerical value of the Greek letters is 365, an important figure in Gnosticism and numerology
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use abraxas in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for abraxas

abraxas

abrasax (əˈbræsəks)

/ (əˈbræksəs) /

noun
an ancient charm composed of Greek letters: originally believed to have magical powers and inscribed on amulets, etc, but from the second century ad personified by Gnostics as a deity, the source of divine emanations

Word Origin for abraxas

from Greek: invented word
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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