Dictionary.com

absolve

[ ab-zolv, -solv ]
/ æbˈzɒlv, -ˈsɒlv /
Save This Word!
See synonyms for: absolve / absolved on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), ab·solved, ab·solv·ing.
to free from guilt or blame or their consequences: The court absolved her of guilt in his death.
to set free or release, as from some duty, obligation, or responsibility (usually followed by from): to be absolved from one's oath.
to grant pardon for.
Ecclesiastical.
  1. to grant or pronounce remission of sins to.
  2. to remit (a sin) by absolution.
  3. to declare (censure, as excommunication) removed.
QUIZ
CUDDLE UP! A COZY QUIZ ON FALL WORDS HAS ARRIVED
If autumn is your ideal season, spice up your repertoire of "fall" vocabulary with this quiz on some warm and vivid descriptive words for the season.
Question 1 of 10
Which of the following words means “to make a crackling sound; crackle”?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of absolve

1525–35; <Latin absolvere, equivalent to ab-ab- + solvere to loosen; see solve

synonym study for absolve

1. Absolve, acquit, exonerate all mean to free from blame. Absolve is a general word for this idea. To acquit is to release from a specific and usually formal accusation: The court must acquit the accused if there is not enough evidence of guilt. To exonerate is to consider a person clear of blame or consequences for an act (even when the act is admitted), or to justify the person for having done it: to be exonerated for a crime committed in self-defense.

OTHER WORDS FROM absolve

ab·solv·a·ble, adjectiveab·sol·vent, adjective, nounab·solv·er, nounun·ab·solved, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use absolve in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for absolve

absolve
/ (əbˈzɒlv) /

verb (tr)
(usually foll by from) to release from blame, sin, punishment, obligation, or responsibility
to pronounce not guilty; acquit; pardon

Derived forms of absolve

absolvable, adjectiveabsolver, noun

Word Origin for absolve

C15: from Latin absolvere to free from, from ab- 1 + solvere to make loose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK