ache

[eyk]
||

verb (used without object), ached, ach·ing.

to have or suffer a continuous, dull pain: His whole body ached.
to feel great sympathy, pity, or the like: Her heart ached for the starving animals.
to feel eager; yearn; long: She ached to be the champion. He's just aching to get even.

noun

a continuous, dull pain (in contrast to a sharp, sudden, or sporadic pain).

Nearby words

  1. achalasia,
  2. achan,
  3. acharya,
  4. achates,
  5. achaz,
  6. achebe,
  7. achebe, chinua,
  8. acheilary,
  9. acheilia,
  10. acheiria

Origin of ache

before 900; (v.) Middle English aken, Old English acan; perhaps metaphoric use of earlier unattested sense “drive, impel” (compare Old Norse aka, cognate with Latin agere, Greek ágein); (noun) derivative of the v.

Synonym study

4. See pain.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ache


British Dictionary definitions for ache

ache

verb (intr)

to feel, suffer, or be the source of a continuous dull pain
to suffer mental anguish

noun

a continuous dull pain
Derived Formsaching, adjectiveachingly, adverb

Word Origin for ache

Old English ācan (vb), æce (n), Middle English aken (vb), ache (n). Compare bake, batch

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ache
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for ache

ache

[āk]

n.

A dull persistent pain.

v.

To suffer a dull, sustained pain.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.