across-the-board

[ uh-kraws-thuh-bawrd, -bohrd, uh-kros- ]
/ əˈkrɔs ðəˈbɔrd, -ˈboʊrd, əˈkrɒs- /

adjective

applying to all employees, members, groups, or categories; general: The across-the-board pay increase means a raise for all employees.
(of a bet) covering all possibilities of winning on a given result, especially by placing a combination bet on one horse in a race for win, place, and show.

Origin of across-the-board

First recorded in 1940–45

Definition for across the board (2 of 2)

board

[ bawrd, bohrd ]
/ bɔrd, boʊrd /

noun


verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to take one's meals, or be supplied with food and lodging at a fixed price: Several of us board at the same rooming house.
Ice Hockey. to hit an opposing player with a board check.

Origin of board

before 900; Middle English, Old English bord board, table, shield; cognate with Dutch boord board, bord plate, German Bort, Old Norse borth, Gothic -baurd

Related forms

board·a·ble, adjectiveboard·like, adjectivere·board, verb (used with object)un·board·ed, adjective

Can be confused

board boredboard committee council panel trust
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for across the board (1 of 2)

across-the-board

adjective

(of salary increases, taxation cuts, etc) affecting all levels or classes equally
horse racing the US term for each way

British Dictionary definitions for across the board (2 of 2)

board

/ (bɔːd) /

noun


verb

Derived Forms

boardable, adjective

Word Origin for board

Old English bord; related to Old Norse borth ship's side, table, Old High German bort ship's side, Sanskrit bardhaka a cutting off
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with across the board (1 of 2)

across the board

Applying to all the individuals in a group, as in They promised us an across-the-board tax cut, that is, one applying to all taxpayers, regardless of income. This expression comes from horse racing, where it refers to a bet that covers all possible ways of winning money on a race: win (first), place (second), or show (third). The board here is the notice-board on which the races and betting odds are listed. Its figurative use dates from the mid-1900s.


Idioms and Phrases with across the board (2 of 2)

board

see across the board; back to the drawing board; bed and board; bulletin board; by the board; go overboard; on board; open and aboveboard; room and board; stiff as a board; tread the boards.


The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.