advocate

[ verb ad-vuh-keyt; noun ad-vuh-kit, -keyt ]
/ verb ˈæd vəˌkeɪt; noun ˈæd və kɪt, -ˌkeɪt /

verb (used with object), ad·vo·cat·ed, ad·vo·cat·ing.

to speak or write in favor of; support or urge by argument; recommend publicly: He advocated higher salaries for teachers.

verb (used without object), ad·vo·cat·ed, ad·vo·cat·ing.

to act as an advocate: a father who advocates for his disabled child.

noun

a person who speaks or writes in support or defense of a person, cause, etc. (usually followed by of): an advocate of peace.
a person who pleads for or in behalf of another; intercessor.
a person who pleads the cause of another in a court of law.

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Origin of advocate

1300–50; <Latin advocātus legal counselor (originally past participle of advocāre to call to one's aid), equivalent to ad-ad- + voc- call (akin to vōxvoice) + -ātus-ate1; replacing Middle English avocat<Middle French

OTHER WORDS FROM advocate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for advocate

advocate

verb (ˈædvəˌkeɪt)

(tr; may take a clause as object) to support or recommend publicly; plead for or speak in favour of

noun (ˈædvəkɪt, -ˌkeɪt)

a person who upholds or defends a cause; supporter
a person who intercedes on behalf of another
a person who pleads his client's cause in a court of lawSee also barrister, solicitor, counsellor
Scots law the usual word for barrister

Derived forms of advocate

advocatory, adjective

Word Origin for advocate

C14: via Old French from Latin advocātus legal witness, advocate, from advocāre to call as witness, from vocāre to call
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012