Aesopian

[ ee-soh-pee-uhn, ee-sop-ee- ]
/ iˈsoʊ pi ən, iˈsɒp i- /

adjective

of, relating to, or characteristic of Aesop or his fables: a story that points an Aesopian moral.
conveying meaning by hint, euphemism, innuendo, or the like: In the candidate's Aesopian language, “soft on Communism” was to be interpreted as “Communist sympathizer.”

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Aesop was a Greek slave who supposedly lived 620bc–560bc on the island of Samos and told animal fables that teach a lesson (e.g., “The Tortoise and the Hare”). The term Aesopian entered English much later . . . in the late 17th century.

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Also Ae·sop·ic [ee-sop-ik]. /iˈsɒp ɪk/.

Origin of Aesopian

1870–75; <Late Latin Aesōpi(us) + -an
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

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